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Google

Google Makes New Version of JPEG: More Economical

Morrissey Technology – Google’s attempt to create a new photo format via Webp didn’t seem to be very successful, and finally they decided to create a better JPEG format. As is known, Webp is an image format created by Google which is actually intended to replace JPEG, PNG and GIF. This format was first introduced in September 2010, and the first stable version was only released in April 2018.

However, until now the Webp format still seems to be getting “resistance” from users. As a result, Google chose to modify and make JPEG better, namely using jpegli. Jpegli is a coding library made by Google that contains an encoder and decoder. Both of these can follow the “rules” of the original JPEG standard and most 8-bit formalisms. In other words, all photos encoded using jpegli should be compatible with every existing decoder, such as those in browsers or image viewers on user devices.

Google promises jpegli can compress images 35% more than traditional JPEG codecs but still maintain visual quality. From here alone, the advantages of jpegli are very profitable for online use, because it can save bandwidth.

They also claim jpegli makes photos “clearer and displays fewer artifacts.” It can also encode images in 10+ bits, more than the 8 bits in traditional JPEG.

And, most importantly, jpegli also doesn’t require more computing or processing than traditional JPEG, so FOR4D it shouldn’t — it won’t slow down the photo processing process. Currently, the full version of jpegli source code has been posted by Google on GitHub, so anyone who is interested can try it out for themselves.

Google

Will Google’s Search Services Be Paid?

Morrissey Technology – Google plans to introduce an artificial intelligence (AI)-powered search engine feature, dubbed Search Generative Experience (SGE). Google may also charge a fee to allow access to AI-powered search. Google is adding AI chatbots to Search to create Snapshots, brief explanations of search queries, along with helpful links that may offer more information.

At its launch, the tech company said it plans to allow ads on Snapshots to generate revenue. However, based on this report, it seems that Google is now taking a different path. The information comes from a Financial Times report, which cited unnamed sources. It said Google may charge a fee to allow access to AI-powered Search. That’s because the company recently expanded its SGE testing to include users in the US who didn’t even sign up for the feature.

This change may not happen immediately. However, when the tech giant finally releases the service to the public, users may have to pay for it. The report did not say whether a specific revenue system has been decided for the service. However, speculation suggests the system could be bundled with the recently introduced Gemini Advanced subscription for the most advanced version of its Gemini AI.

On the other hand, it can also be offered as a standalone service. This is considering that Google has never charged users anything to use its core Search product. This may also impact website publishers who rely on traffic coming from Google Search rankings for revenue. SGE FOR4D can also have a negative impact on them. The report highlights structured premium tiers are being planned as a solution to avoid losing advertiser revenue, making publishers happy. However, at the same time it creates new revenue opportunities through its AI integration.

Google Incognito Mode

Google Still Collects User Data in Incognito Mode

Morrissey Technology – Google agreed to delete billions of web browsing data collected when users were in incognito mode. However, it is claimed that this data is not used for any personalization. Deleting this data is a form of settlement carried out by Google regarding the lawsuit filed.

The lawsuit, worth US$5 billion (around Rp. 79.6 trillion), contains a calculation of the value of data that Google has stored and been forced to destroy, as well as data that has been prevented from being collected. Google must handle data collected in private browsing mode (Incognito) from December 2023 and earlier. Any data that is not immediately deleted must be de-identified.

In the proposed settlement of this lawsuit, the plaintiff stated that Google’s deletion of data was to ensure Google’s accountability and transparency as the largest data collector in the world.

“This settlement ensures real accountability and transparency from the world’s largest data collector and marks an important step toward improving and enforcing our privacy rights on the Internet,” the plaintiffs wrote in their proposed settlement filing.

Additionally, the proposed settlement in Brown v. It also requires Google to disclose more information about how information is collected in Google Incognito Mode and limit future data collection. If approved by a California federal judge, the settlement could apply to Google’s 136 million users.

Previously, a similar lawsuit was filed by Google account holders in 2020. In their lawsuit claim, the account holders accused the Google company of illegally tracking user behavior through the private browsing feature (Incognito).

Google’s response

Google spokesperson José Castañeda said the company would be happy to settle the lawsuit.

“We are happy to delete old technical data that has never been associated with an individual and has never been used for personalization of any kind,” he said in a statement.

Regarding the plaintiff’s proposed settlement of US$ 5 billion as a form of compensation, his party refused. He said that Google’s settlement of the case did not include compensation in the lawsuit.

However, Google still accepts filing individual claims for compensation in California state court for users who feel they have been harmed in Incognito mode. Currently, there have been 50 individual lawsuits submitted.

In addition to the settlement by deleting data, Google also agreed that in the next five years it will let users block cookies from third parties by default in Incognito mode. The goal, he said, is to prevent Google from tracking users on external websites while they are privately browsing.

Every browser has incognito mode, even though it comes with different names. Chrome calls it Incognito, while Firefox and Safari FOR4D call it Private Browsing, and Microsoft Edge calls it InPrivate.

Basically, all of these features do the same thing, namely ‘forget’ all activity when the browser is used. This means that the user’s browsing history is not saved, and nothing you do is logged.

Browsers simply do not record history and cookies, while users’ online activities can still be recorded by the sites they visit. In other words, Incognito mode provides privacy to the user’s device, but not to online activities.

Google Staff

Google Staff Steals AI Secrets, Sells to Chinese Startup

Morrissey Technology – Google is suing its employees who allegedly stole the company’s artificial intelligence (AI) technology secrets, then sold them to startup companies in China. The employee, named Linwei Ding or Leon Ding, was charged with stealing AI trade secrets from the technology giant and secretly collaborating with two AI industrial companies based in China.

Ding was charged with four counts of theft of trade secrets. If convicted, he faces up to 10 years in prison for each charge.

“The Department of Justice will not tolerate the theft of artificial intelligence and other advanced technology that could endanger our national security,” said Attorney General Merrick Garland in a statement.

Merrick added that his party would firmly protect sensitive technology developed in the United States (US) so that it does not fall into the hands of parties who should not have it.

Ding, a 38-year-old Chinese national living in California, is accused of copying more than 500 files containing confidential information from Google into his personal account over a period of one year starting in 2022. Prosecutors said these files included technology involved in the central building blocks Google’s advanced supercomputer data.

Ding currently does not have a lawyer to face the lawsuit. As part of his responsibilities at Google FOR4D, prosecutors said, Ding helped develop software used in Google’s supercomputer data centers. The job gave Ding access to Google’s hardware infrastructure, software platforms, and the AI ​​models and applications they support.

The Justice Department said months after Ding allegedly started copying Google files, he was offered a position as chief technology officer for an “early-stage technology company” based in China.

Ding allegedly went to China for several months, where he participated in investor meetings to raise money for the company. Potential investors in the company were told that Ding was an executive and owned 20 percent of the company. Prosecutors said Ding took steps to hide his work while in China, including having other employees use his badge to access his office to make it appear he was in the US. In the following year, Ding founded his own technology company in the field of “AI and machine learning industry.”

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